Revised Grade 11 Expectations

Religious Education: “Faith and Culture: World Religions” Grade 11 Expectations Revised 2010

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In revising the expectations for Grade 11 Religious Education, the following changes have been made:

  1. The expectations are now written for University/College (M) and for Open (O).
  2. Descriptors and prerequisites have been slightly modified to reflect the changes in number 1 above.
  3. Overall and Specific expectations have been linked and rewritten to represent more accurately a Catholic approach to the study of world religions (e.g. greater emphasis on ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, inclusion of comparative expectations.)
  4. Expectations have been written in light of the Social Science expectations for world religions courses outlined in the Ministry of Education policy document. This ensures the acceptance of this course by universities as a Social Science credit while maintaining a Catholic catechetical approach.
  5. A sixth strand has been added – Research and Inquiry – also in keeping with Ontario Ministry of Education expectations and the need to build these skills to prepare students for further study of religion in post secondary institutions.
  6. Change has been made to the first number in each Specific Expectation. The letters and numbers of each coded Specific Expectation indicate – in this order – the strand (SC, PF, CM, PS, FL, RI); the number of the Overall Expectation to which it is related (SC3), and the number of the specific strand (.07).

Religious Education: “Faith and Culture: World Religions” Grade 11 Expectations Revised 2010

Course Description: Grade 11 University/College

This course will fulfil the expectations of the Church in its desire that students in Catholic schools develop an objective and respectful understanding of other religious traditions from the perspective of the Catholic Church. To that end, student learning will include an understanding of the Church’s teachings on world religious traditions and those principles which inform ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, together with an historical overview of the Church’s relationship with various religions, particularly Judaism and Islam. For all students, this course will help break down prejudice about other religions, and for some they may lead to a deeper understanding and more authentic adherence to the teachings of the Church concerning spiritual and moral truth. Other religious traditions are encountered through the unique perspective of the Catholic Church. Pre-requisite: Grade 10 Open Religion or Grade 10 Academic or Applied English

Course Description: Grade 11 Open

This course will fulfil the expectations of the Church in its desire that students in Catholic schools develop an objective and respectful understanding of other religious traditions from the perspective of the Catholic Church. Students will explore the universal themes within the world’s major religious traditions. Within a contemporary cultural context, students will explore the encounter between Christianity and other religious traditions. For all students, this course will help break down prejudice about other religions, and for some they may lead to a deeper understanding and more authentic adherence to the teachings of the Church concerning spiritual and moral truth. Other religious traditions are encountered through the unique perspective of the Catholic Church. Pre-requisite: none

Strands

  • Scripture
  • Profession of Faith
  • Christian Moral Development
  • Prayer and Sacramental Life
  • Family Life Education
  • Research and Inquiry Skills

COURSE EXPECTATIONS: GRADE 11 UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE

SCRIPTURE

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • understand Scripture as a basis for the Catholic Church’s stance regarding interreligious and ecumenical dialogue;
  • understand the important role of sacred writings in the formation of religious identity and moral life in other religions;
  • recognize the Bible as revelation of God’s word.

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • SCV01: examine the literary characteristics, origin and development of the sacred writings and oral traditions of the various religious traditions;
  • SCV02: analyse key narratives and events in the sacred text/oral traditions of world religions to identify their significance and meaning;
  • SCV03: demonstrate an understanding of how sacred texts are interpreted and applied within various religions;
  • SCV04: interpret and compare sacred texts from various religions with accuracy and respect.

Specific Expectations:

By the end of this course, students will:

Characteristics, Origin, Development: Sacred Texts/Oral Traditions

  • SC1.01: identify the sacred texts of various world religions and describe their structure

(e.g. collection of books), and the literary form (narrative, poetry, koan) used by the author(s);

  • SC1.02: examine sacred text/oral narratives in light of their origin, author(s) (e.g. Muhammad, Siddhartha Gautama, Guru Gobind Singh) and audience (e.g. the communities of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John);
  • SC1.03: analyse the importance of the life and teaching of founders, key figures, great teachers of the world’s religious traditions (e.g. Abraham, Jesus, Muhammad, Siddhartha Gautama) to the development of the religion’s sacred texts/oral traditions;
  • SC1.04: compare/contrast the function and role of sacred text/oral tradition across various religions (e.g. source and transmission of beliefs/teachings, practices, rituals, moral codes).

Significance and Meaning of Sacred Texts

  • SC2.05: identify and interpret significant sacred writings and/or oral tradition from various religions that express central beliefs (e.g. creation, the nature of God/the supernatural/deities, the soul, dignity of the person, moral precepts, social justice) and compare across religions;
  • SC2.06: examine the aboriginal myths and narratives of Canada’s indigenous peoples to determine their meaning and significance;
  • SC2.07: analyse key passages in the philosophical and mythical writings of Hinduism and Buddhism and interpret their meaning and purpose (e.g. ethical, spiritual guidance) for adherents.

Interpretation and Application of Sacred Texts

  • SC3.08: compare the image and nature of God/the transcendent/the holy Other/the divine as professed by the world’s religious traditions;
  • SC3.09: evaluate and compare passages from various religions that identify moral/ethical principles;
  • SC3.10: identify the link between sacred scripture, the unfolding of revelation and the structure of religious communities and institutions.

Respect for Sacred Texts/Oral Tradition

  • SC4.11: analyse various passages from the sacred texts of various religions with interest and discuss their meaning without prejudice or bias;
  • SC4.12: retell the narratives of various religions maintaining the tradition’s tone and reverence for what it reveals;
  • SC4:13: examine the manner in which other religions show respect for their sacred text, oral traditions.

PROFESSION OF FAITH

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • value the importance of the historical development of Catholicism for personal and communal religious identity within the Church;
  • critically study the world’s religious traditions in view of the centrality of human dignity and personhood;
  • respond in wonder and awe to the mysteries of creation;
  • respect the various expressions of the sacred as found in the world’s major religious traditions;
  • appreciate the contributions which the major world religious traditions have made to Canadian society;
  • understand the role of family in the various religious traditions, and appreciate the Catholic stance in this regard.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • PFV.01: demonstrate an understanding of religion as an innate human response to our encounter with God/Transcendent/Supernatural in our search for meaning and purpose;
  • PFV.02: describe the worldview of various religions and their precepts;
  • PFV.03: describe the historical development of the world’s religious traditions within culture;
  • PFV.04: assess the ways in which the various religions respond to globalization (modernity);
  • PFV.05: describe the nature and assess the need for interreligious and ecumenical dialogue.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Religions as an Innate Response to the Sacred

  • PF1.01: explain various ways in which people encounter the sacred in life (in nature, prayer, meditation, key life events, in an encounter with others);
  • PF1.02: explain what it means to live according to a particular religious worldview;
  • PF1.03: examine the human search for meaning and purpose as found within contemporary culture (e.g., through contemporary art, music, film, mass media).

Religious Worldview

  • PF2.04: examine some of the key concepts, philosophical ideals that contribute to the formation of a particular religious worldview (e.g. the existence of God, the sanctity of life, the significance of marriage and family life, the possibility of peace, the reality of death and afterlife, life as vocation);
  • PF2.05: describe and compare the ways individuals, families and religious institutions live out their religious beliefs in everyday life as faithful adherents of various religions;
  • PF2.06: critically analyze and compare the central tenets of the world’s religious traditions and their significance for adherents (e.g. ahimsa, the sanctity of all life, human dignity, resurrection/reincarnation, destiny/divine providence).

Historical Development within Culture

  • PF3.07: identify key events in the historical development of the world’s religions (the First Ecumenical Council at Nicaea, Jewish Diaspora) and evaluate their influence on the religion’s self-understanding (e.g. the formulation of the Apostolic and Nicene Creed for Christians, Rabbinic Judaism);
  • PF3.08: analyse the religious and cultural mosaic that constitutes Canadian society (e.g. analyse demographic data to determine the global spread of the world’s religious traditions and the religious fabric of Canada, identify the local presence of various religious communities);
  • PF3.09: identify key figures within the various religions and assess the significance of their life and contributions to society and to the development of their religions (e.g. Martin Luther, Gandhi, Jesus, Mohammad, Abraham, Siddhartha Gautama);
  • PF3.10: explain how various cultural and theological shifts contributed to the development of differing expression of faith within various religions (e.g. The divisions in Judaism, the great schism of East and West, the Protestant Reformation).

Religious Response to Globalization

  • PF4.11: describe the interrelationship between faith and culture and assess its impact on the various professions of faith;
  • PF4.12: identify and explain the key features of modernity/globalization (Individualism, secularism, scientism, technology) and critically evaluate the positive and negative impact of each on the profession of faith in contemporary society (e.g. separation of Church and state; challenges to the wearing of religious symbols and prayer requirement; the secularization of Christmas and Easter; the development of policies and practices to protect religious freedom);
  • PF4.13: describe the rise of religious movements in response to modernity (e.g. agnosticism, atheism, human secularism, fundamentalism, liberalism) and identify their central beliefs and ethical/moral stance.

Interreligious Dialogue

  • PF5.14: define in their own words the Catholic Church’s position on inter-faith and ecumenical dialogue with reference to primary documents (e.g. Nostra Aetate/ Redemptoris Missio);
  • PF5.15: analyze and apply key principles for ecumenical/interreligious dialogue (e.g. dialogue free of bias and preconceived assumptions, equality of participants) from a Catholic perspective;
  • PF5.16: assess opportunities and research practical examples of the ongoing practice of interfaith dialogue (e.g. the cooperative efforts address issues of social justice, biographies, interreligious conferences/meetings, interreligious organizations, monastic communities).

CHRISTIAN MORAL DEVELOPMENT

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • recognize the importance of moral living in the human search for meaning and purpose;
  • appreciate the role moral codes play in religious worldviews;
  • critically name the way secularism influences moral behaviour within contemporary culture;
  • critically name the impact of religious fundamentalism and cults on the moral behaviour of their members;
  • understand how the moral teachings of the world’s major religious traditions are used as guidelines by their members for daily living;
  • recognize historical and contemporary examples of moral living as found in the various religions of the world;
  • appreciate the role world religions can play in transforming human institutions, and the impact this can have on changing the human heart.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • CMV.01: demonstrate an understanding of moral norms as a natural expression of one’s faith;
  • CMV.02: demonstrate an understanding of the key moral precepts of various world religions and assess their power to shape the lives of adherents;
  • CMV.03: explain the relationship of religious moral precepts to social responsibility, peace and justice, pursuit of the common good, and the betterment of society in general;
  • CMV.04: explain the influence of culture on the interpretation of moral codes and practices within various religions.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Moral Norms as Expression of Faith

  • CM1.01: explain the significance of morality in the human search for meaning and purpose;
  • CM1.02: explain the role worldviews and ritual play in shaping moral codes;
  • CM1.03: assess the need for moral norms in the promotion of justice and peace

Key Moral Precepts and Their Importance

  • CM2.04: identify the moral precepts of the various religions (the Rahit Maryada of Sikhism, the Ten Commandments of Christianity), and their source in revealed truth;
  • CM2.05: compare the values/virtues/moral precepts/guidelines of the various religions and identify common moral principles;
  • CM2.06: analyze how moral precepts influence everyday life for adherents of various religions (e.g. sexual conduct and marriage, family life, charitable outreach).

Moral Precepts and Social Responsibility

  • CM3.07: explain how individuals from the various religions have worked to overcome discrimination and injustice and for the betterment of society in general (Ghandi, Guru Nanak, Jesus);
  • CM3.08: critically assess how various world religions have applied their moral teachings to contemporary social justice issues (e.g. war and peace, poverty, sanctity of life, environmental degradation, human rights).

Influence of Culture on Moral Living

  • CM4.09: compare the moral precepts/guidelines of the major world religions with those found in contemporary culture (e.g. Golden Rule);
  • CM4.10: identify and assess the positive impact modernity has had to human freedom and social justice (e.g. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Bill of Rights, The Declaration on Religious Freedom);
  • CM4.11: critically analyze how contemporary moral norms, influenced by the ‘isms’ of modernity (secularism, individualism, relativism), impact on the moral stance of individuals and religious institutions within that culture;
  • CM4.12: identify challenges of, and strategies for living a moral life in Canadian society (e.g. case studies/debates regarding blood transfusions, wearing kirpan or hijab, Islam’s daily prayer practices, shariah law).

PRAYER AND SACRAMENTAL LIFE

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • recognize the importance of prayer and worship for a religious worldview;
  • know and respect the diverse forms of prayer and worship found in the religions of the world;
  • know and respect the religious symbols in the world’s major religious traditions;
  • recognize and appreciate the impact of Judaism on Catholic prayer and liturgical forms.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • PSV.01: explain the role rituals play within a religious worldview;
  • PSV.02: assess the importance of worship and prayer within various religious traditions;
  • PSV.03: demonstrate an understanding of the influence of globalization on worship and prayer;
  • PSV.04: understand the role of religious art, symbol and gesture within the world’s major religious traditions;
  • PSV.05: explain the importance of sacred space and religious community in the spiritual life of various religions.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Role of Rituals

  • PS1.01 explain the nature of ritual and assess its importance in the formation of religious communities and the marking of key moments in life;
  • PS1.02: explain the key elements of important ritual celebrations within various religions and explain their origin and meaning for adherents;
  • PS1.03: explain the structuring of time within various religions (calendars, lunar cycles, jubilees) around ritual feasts and festivals that commemorate significant people and events in the life of a religious tradition;
  • PS1.04: explain similarities and differences in rituals (sacraments, ashrama, bat/bar mitzvah, sacred thread ceremony) that celebrate life milestones (birth, coming of age, marriage, death) across various religions.

Importance of Worship and Prayer

  • PS2.05: demonstrate an understanding of religious worship and prayer as a response to sacred reality and necessary for life’s spiritual journey;
  • PS2.06: compare the practice of prayer, meditation, fasting, sacrifice and pilgrimage within various religions and assess their importance for spiritual growth;
  • PS2.07: compare the forms of private and communal worship practiced within various religions.

Influence of Globalization on Worship and Prayer

  • PS3.08: explain the nature of mysticism and monastic movements within various religions and explain their contributions to interreligious dialogue;
  • PS3.09: assess the influence other religions have had on the prayer practices of the Catholic Church (e.g. aspects of Native Spirituality and Easter meditation);
  • PS3.10: critically analyse Canadian culture and law to identify challenges to religious prayer practices for immigrant families in Canada;
  • PS3.11: analyse the major contemporary statements of the Catholic Church with regard to interreligious and ecumenical prayer and worship;
  • PS3.12: explain how Catholic principles for interreligious dialogue apply to the creation of interreligious prayer.

Religious Art, Symbols, Gestures

  • PS4.13: explain the power of symbols and symbolic gesture/movement to convey mystery and belief, to connect past and present, and to signify belonging;
  • PS4.14: identify key symbols and symbolic ritual actions within various world religions and explain their meaning/significance for adherents;
  • PS4.15: explain the influence of religion on artistic expression (art, architecture, music, literature) and compare the stance taken by various religions toward the use of art as an expression of belief images in worship and prayer.

Sacred Space and Community

  • PS5.16: explain the significance and nature of places of worship and sacred space within various religions;
  • PS5.17: explain how the various features (architecture, art, treatment of their sacred text, use of space and decor) of their places of worship reflect their worldview;
  • PS5.18: identify the principles/beliefs that underlie the structure of religious communities/churches (role and responsibilities of individuals with religious communities/institutions) and in some cases, social communities (caste system of India).

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • critically assess how the conflicting messages of contemporary culture distort the intrinsic dignity of the human person and of authentic relationships;
  • recognize the ways in which sexuality is called to be loving and life-giving;
  • commit to the virtue of chastity in guiding their self-expression as sexual beings;
  • critically assess world religious traditions in view of the centrality of human dignity and personhood.

 

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • FLV.01: examine the role of family within the world’s major religious traditions;
  • FLV.02: analyze and compare gender roles within Canadian society and the world’s major religious traditions;
  • FLV.03: assess how various religions address the dignity of the person within society and within intimate human relationships (marriage, sexuality, chastity, as family);
  • FLV.04: critically assess how contemporary culture impacts on religious anthropology.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Role of the Family

  • FL1.01: describe and compare the image of family life that is promoted by various world religions;
  • FL1.02: critically evaluate the role of home and family in the transmission of faith and the formation of moral persons within various religions;
  • FL1.03: explain the practices within the families of various religions that strengthen a sense of community, hospitality and outreach.

Gender Roles

  • FL2.04: describe the various roles of women and men within various religious traditions;
  • FL2.05: compare gender roles within Canadian society in general with those prescribed for the families of various religions;
  • FL2.06: critically analyze the presence of gender discrimination within the practices of various religious traditions and its impact on the lives of adherents.

Promotion of Human Dignity

  • FL3.07: identify the beliefs of the world’s major religious traditions that inform their understanding of the dignity of the person and human sexuality;
  • FL3.08: describe the views of various religions with regard to human sexuality (e.g. marriage, divorce, abortion, reproductive technology) and compare across various religions;
  • FL3.09: describe the presence and critically assess the impact of religious prejudice, discrimination and bias on the global and local community (war, hate crimes, unjust laws and hiring practices).

Impact of Culture on Religious Anthropology

  • FL4.10: explain how rituals, prayer life and daily practices express and maintain a religious way of life within families;
  • FL4.11: critically analyze ways in which Canadian culture challenges the transmission of faith within families (influence of media, multiculturalism, secularism, commercialism, materialism, individualism);
  • FL4.12: analyse primary documents that support and challenge religious freedom and family values in contemporary Canada.

RESEARCH AND INQUIRY SKILLS

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • RIV.01: effectively employ a variety of research and inquiry skills (opinion survey, demographic study, in-depth interview, database search, exploration of primary sources);
  • RIV.02: communicate the results of inquiries effectively;
  • RIV.03: demonstrate effective collaborative group skills.

Specific Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

Using Research and Inquiry Skills

  • RI1.01: effectively employ several research methodologies (e.g. opinion survey, demographic study, in-depth interview, database search, exploration of primary and secondary sources, internet search, and independent study);
  • RI1.02: analyse research information for bias/prejudice/misinformation;
  • RI1.03: develop research topics based on contemporary and historical religious issues;
  • RI1.04: demonstrate an ability to organize, interpret, and evaluate (for validity, accuracy) information gathered through research.

Effective Communication

  • RI2.05: demonstrate an ability to summarize key ideas from research, document sources accurately;
  • RI2.06: effectively communicate the results of their inquiries, using a variety of methods and forms;
  • RI2.07: demonstrate an ability to use communication technology appropriately to produce/disseminate the results of their research;
  • RI2.08: use appropriate style, structure, argument, and documentation in presenting conclusions/opinions.

Collaborative Work Skills

  • RI3.09: work effectively in small collaborative groups;
  • RI3.10: use self-assessment to strengthen cooperative learning/working skills.

Course Expectations: Grade 11 Open

SCRIPTURE

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • understand Scripture as a basis for the Catholic Church’s stance regarding interreligious and ecumenical dialogue;
  • understand the important role of sacred writings in the formation of religious identity and moral life in other religions;
  • recognize the Bible as revelation of God’s word.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • SCV.01: examine the origin and development of the sacred writings and oral traditions of the various religious traditions;
  • SCV.02: demonstrate an understanding of the significance and meaning of key narratives and events in the sacred text/oral traditions of world religions;
  • SCV.03: demonstrate an understanding of how sacred texts are interpreted and applied within various religions;
  • SCV.04: use and apply sacred texts and oral traditions of various world religions with accuracy and respect.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Characteristics, Origin and Development: Sacred Writings /Oral Traditions

  • SC1.01: recall the names of the sacred texts of various world religions and identify some of the various literary forms used (e.g. narrative, poetry, psalm);
  • SC1.02: describe the origin of sacred texts and oral traditions for various religions;
  • SC1.03: summarize the life events of key figures/founders of various religions and the role they played in the development of its sacred text/oral tradition (e.g. Abraham, Jesus, Muhammad, Siddhartha Gautama);
  • SC1.04: link selected narratives and passages from oral traditions/sacred texts to beliefs, rituals and moral codes that form a worldview for various religions.

Significance and Meaning of Sacred Text/Oral Traditions

  • SC2.05: compare/contrast similar concepts as they are expressed within the sacred writings and/or oral tradition of various religions and understood by adherents (e.g. creation, God/the supernatural/deities, the soul, the dignity of persons, moral precepts, duty/responsibility);
  • SC2.06: demonstrate an understanding of the message and meaning of aboriginal myths and narratives of Canada’s indigenous peoples;
  • SC2.07: demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical and mythical writings of Hinduism and Buddhism and their importance for adherents.

Interpretation and Application of Sacred Texts

  • SC3.08: compare the image and nature of God/the transcendent/the holy Other/the divine as professed by the world’s religious traditions;
  • SC3.09: identify and compare key principles for moral living found in sacred writings/oral traditions of various religions;
  • SC3.10: describe the structure of various religious communities and institutions in light of their sacred texts/oral tradition.

Respect for Sacred Texts/Oral Tradition

  • SC4.11: discuss the meaning of various passages from the sacred texts of various religions without prejudice or bias;
  • SC4.12: retell the narratives of various religions maintaining the tradition’s tone and reverence for what it reveals;
  • SC4:13: describe the manner in which other religions show respect for their sacred text, oral traditions.

PROFESSION OF FAITH

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • value the importance of the historical development of Catholicism for personal and communal religious identity within the Church;
  • critically study the world’s religious traditions in view of the centrality of human dignity and personhood;
  • respond in wonder and awe to the mysteries of creation;
  • respect the various expressions of the sacred as found in the world’s major religious traditions;
  • appreciate the contributions which the major world religious traditions have made to Canadian society;
  • understand the role of family in the various religious traditions, and appreciate the Catholic stance in this regard.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • PFV.01: demonstrate an understanding of religion as an innate human response to our encounter with God/transcendent/supernatural in our search for meaning and purpose;
  • PFV.02: describe various elements of the worldview of various religions;
  • PFV.03: describe key moments in the historical development of the world’s religious traditions within culture;
  • PFV.04: compare ways in which the various religions respond to globalization (modernity);
  • PFV.05: describe the nature of interreligious and ecumenical dialogue and discuss why it is necessary for peace and justice.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Religions as an Innate Response to the Sacred

  • PF1.01: describe various ways in which people encounter the sacred in life (in nature, prayer, meditation, key life events, in an encounter with others);
  • PF1.02: provide examples of what it means to live according to a particular religious worldview;
  • PF1.03: identify examples of the human search for meaning and purpose within contemporary culture (e.g., through contemporary art, music, film, mass media).

Religious Worldview

  • PF2.04: identify some of the key concepts, philosophical ideals that contribute to the formation of a particular religious worldview (e.g., the existence of God, the sanctity of life, the significance of marriage and family life, the possibility of peace, the reality of death and afterlife, life as vocation);
  • PF2.05: describe the various ways in which individuals, families and religious institutions live out their religious beliefs in everyday life as faithful adherents of various religions;
  • PF2.06: compare across various religious traditions their central tenets (e.g. ahimsa, the sanctity of all life, human dignity, resurrection/reincarnation, destiny/divine providence) to find commonalities and differences.

Historical Development

  • PF3.07: chart key events (e.g. the First Ecumenical Council at Nicaea, the Jewish Diaspora) in the historical development of the world’s religions and the changes they brought about (e.g. the formulation of the Apostolic and Nicene Creed for Christians, Rabbinic Judaism);
  • PF3.08: describe and reflect on the religious and cultural mosaic that constitutes Canadian society (e.g. work in groups to gather and present demographic data on the global spread of the world’s religious traditions and the religious fabric of Canada, identify the local presence of various religious communities);
  • PF3.09: identify key figures within the various religions and describe their life and contributions to society and to the development of their religions (e.g. Martin Luther, Gandhi, Jesus, Mohammad, Abraham, Siddhartha Gautama);
  • PF3.10: recognize the cultural and theological shifts that contributed to the development of differing expression of faith within various religions (e.g. The divisions in Judaism, the great schism of East and West, the Protestant Reformation).

Religious Response to Globalization

  • PF4.11: explain ways in which culture has and continues to influence the practice and profession of faith;
  • PF4.12: define the meaning of individualism, secularism, and scientism, and find examples of the positive and negative impact of each on the profession of faith in contemporary society (e.g. separation of Church and state; challenges to the wearing of religious symbols and prayer requirement; the secularization of Christmas and Easter, the development of policies and practices to protect religious freedom);
  • PF4.13: demonstrate an understanding of the various religious movements that arose in response to modernity (e.g. agnosticism, atheism, human secularism, fundamentalism, liberalism).

Interreligious Dialogue

  • PF5.14: demonstrate a basic understanding of ecumenical and interreligious dialogue as presented in excerpts from Catholic primary (e.g. Nostra Aetate/Redemptoris Missio) and secondary documents/texts, Scarboro Missions’ Newsletters;
  • PF5.15: identify and explain key principles for ecumenical/interreligious dialogue from a Catholic perspective;
  • PF5.16: research and explain practical examples of the ongoing practice of interfaith dialogue (e.g. the cooperative efforts address issues of social justice, biographies, interreligious conferences/meetings, interreligious organizations, monastic communities).

CHRISTIAN MORAL DEVELOPMENT

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • recognize the importance of moral living in the human search for meaning and purpose;
  • appreciate the role moral codes play in religious worldviews;
  • critically name the way secularism influences moral behaviour within contemporary culture;
  • critically name the impact of religious fundamentalism and cults on the moral behaviour of their members;
  • understand how the moral teachings of the world’s major religious traditions are used as guidelines by their members for daily living;
  • recognize historical and contemporary examples of moral living as found in the various religions of the world;
  • appreciate the role world religions can play in transforming human institutions, and the impact this can have on changing the human heart.

 

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • CMV.01: demonstrate an understanding of moral norms as a natural expression of one’s faith shaping human behaviour;
  • CMV.02: demonstrate a practical understanding of the key moral precepts of various world religions and their importance in the lives of adherents;
  • CMV.03: describe the relationship of religious moral precepts to social responsibility, peace, justice, and the betterment of society in general;
  • CMV.04: describe the influence of culture on the interpretation of moral codes and practices within various religions.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

Moral Norms as Expression of Faith

  • CM1.01: describe the practical consequences, both positive and negative, of following religious and cultural moral norms in the human search for meaning and purpose;
  • CM1.02: explain the practical link between beliefs, rituals and moral codes which shape human behaviour;
  • CM1.03: explain the role moral norms play in the promotion of justice and peace.

Importance of Key Moral Precepts

  • CM2.04: describe the key moral precepts of the various religions (the Rahit Maryada of Sikhism, the Ten Commandments of Christianity), as presented in their sacred writings/oral tradition;
  • CM2.05: compare the values/virtues/ moral precepts/guidelines of the various religions and identify common moral principles;
  • CM2.06: compare how moral precepts influence everyday life for adherents of various religions (e.g. sexual conduct and marriage, family life, charitable outreach).

Moral Precepts and Social Responsibility

  • CM3.07: research individuals from the various religions who have worked for the betterment of society and to overcome discrimination and injustice (Ghandi, Guru Nanak, Jesus) [produce biographies as a product task not an expectation];
  • CM3.08: describe how various world religions have applied their moral teachings to critical contemporary social justice issues (e.g., war and peace, poverty, sanctity of life, environmental degradation, human rights).

Influence of Culture on Moral Living

  • CM4.09: compare the moral precepts/guidelines of the major world religions with those found in contemporary culture (e.g., Golden Rule);
  • CM4.10: provide examples of various freedoms and rights that are legally protected in Canada today as a result of the ideologies of modernity (e.g. freedom of religion, thought/speech, assembly, association, right to vote, access to public buildings);
  • CM4.11: identify signs of secularism, individualism, materialism, relativism in the media and describe their impact on the moral understanding of individuals living within Canadian culture;
  • CM4.12: describe some of the challenges of living a moral life in Canadian society, and suggest possible strategies (e.g. case studies/mini symposium/debates regarding blood transfusions, wearing kirpan or hijab, Islam’s daily prayer practices, shariah law).

PRAYER AND SACRAMENTAL LIFE

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • recognize the importance of prayer and worship for a religious worldview;
  • know and respect the diverse forms of prayer and worship found in the religions of the world;
  • know and respect the religious symbols in the world’s major religious traditions;
  • recognize and appreciate the impact of Judaism on Catholic prayer and liturgical forms.

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • PSV.01: describe the role rituals play within a religious worldview;
  • PSV.02: compare the importance of worship and prayer within various religious traditions;
  • PSV.03: describe and explain the influence of cultural diversity on the practice of worship and prayer;
  • PSV.04: explain the meaning of religious art, symbol and gesture as expressions of sometimes complex religious beliefs;
  • PSV.05: explain the importance of sacred space and religious community in the spiritual life of various religions.

Specific Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

The Role of Rituals

  • PS1.01 describe the nature of ritual and give examples of how they function to form religious communities and mark key moments in life;
  • PS1.02: describe the key elements of important ritual celebrations within various religions and explain their origin and meaning for adherents;
  • PS1.03: link the ritual feasts and festivals of various religions with the events and people they commemorate, their meaning, and the means (e.g. liturgical calendars, lunar cycles) used to structure the dates on which they are celebrated;
  • PS1.04: describe similarities and differences in rituals (sacraments, ashrama, bat/bar mitzvah, sacred thread ceremony) that celebrate life milestones (birth, coming of age, marriage, death) across various religions.

Importance of Worship and Prayer

  • PS2.05: demonstrate an understanding of religious worship and prayer as a response to sacred reality and necessary for life’s spiritual journey;
  • PS2.06: describe the practice of prayer, meditation, fasting, sacrifice and pilgrimage and explain their importance for spiritual growth within various religions;
  • PS2.07: describe the forms of private and communal worship practiced within various religions.

The Influence of Globalization on Worship and Prayer

  • PS3.08: describe examples of interreligious dialogue between monks from the Eastern religions and Christianity (e.g. ecological efforts, learning and living together);
  • PS3.09: describe the influence other religions have had on the prayer practices of the Catholic Church (e.g. Passover and the Mass, aspects of Native Spirituality and Easter meditation);
  • PS3.10: provide possible solutions to situation where immigrants feel they are not free to worship and pray as their religion requires (e.g. Islam and daily prayer in the workplace);
  • PS3.11: explain the Catholic Church’s teachings with regard to interreligious prayer and worship (prayer as a declaration of belief, as a confession of full communion);
  • PS3.12: explain how Catholic principles for interreligious dialogue apply to the creation of interreligious prayer.

Religious Art, Symbols, Gestures

  • PS4.13: describe the power of symbols and symbolic gesture/movement to convey mystery and belief, to connect past and present, and to provide a sense of belonging;
  • PS4.14: identify some of the key symbols and symbolic ritual actions within various world religions and explain their meaning/significance for adherents;
  • PS4.15: describe the connection between religious worship and the arts (influence of religion on artistic works of art, architecture, music, literature).

Sacred Space and Community

  • PS5.16: name the place of worship and discuss the significance of sacred space within various religions;
  • PS5.17: connect the various features (architecture, art, treatment of their sacred text, use of space and decor) of their places of worship to elements of their worldview (beliefs, moral codes, practices);
  • PS5.18: describe the structure of various religious communities (role and responsibilities of individuals with religious communities/institutions) and in some cases, social communities (caste system of India).

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION

Our hope is that Religious Education will help students:

  • critically assess how the conflicting messages of contemporary culture distort the intrinsic dignity of the human person and of authentic relationships;
  • recognize the ways in which sexuality is called to be loving and life-giving;
  • commit to the virtue of chastity in guiding their self-expression as sexual beings;
  • critically assess world religious traditions in view of the centrality of human dignity and personhood.

 

Overall Expectations

By the end of the course, students will:

  • FLV.01: examine the role of family within the world’s major religious traditions;
  • FLV.02: compare gender roles within Canadian society and the world’s major religious traditions;
  • FLV.03: use specific examples to explain how various religions promote the dignity of the person within society and within intimate human relationships (marriage, sexuality, chastity, as family);
  • FLV.04: explain how contemporary culture impacts on the image of the person and the family held by various world religions.

Specific Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

Role of the Family

  • FL1.01: describe some of the key features of family life that are promoted by various world religions and compare it with their own understanding of family;
  • FL1.02: explain using specific examples how faith and moral attitudes are transmitted within the home through the efforts of family members within various religions;
  • FL1.03: identify the practices within the families of various religions that strengthen a sense of community, hospitality and outreach in light of their own lived experience.

Gender Roles

  • FL2.04: describe the roles of women and men within various religious traditions;
  • FL2.05: compare gender roles within Canadian society in general with those prescribed for the families of various religions;
  • FL2.06: identify instances of gender discrimination within the practices of various religious traditions and describe its impact of the lives of adherents.

Promotion of Human Dignity

  • FL3.07: identify some beliefs of the world’s major religious traditions that inform their understanding of the dignity of the person and human sexuality;
  • FL3.08: compare the views of various religions with regard to human sexuality (e.g. marriage, divorce, abortion, reproductive technology);
  • FL3.09: provide examples of the presence and impact of religious prejudice, discrimination and bias on the global and local community (war, hate crimes, unjust laws and hiring practices).

Impact of Culture on the Individual and Families

  • FL4.10: describe the importance of rituals, prayer life and daily practices for living a religious way of life;
  • FL4.11: describe how media messages challenge the beliefs of various religions and explain the implications for families of faith;
  • FL4.12: explain some of the efforts that have been made to support religious freedom and to promote the importance of the family in Canadian society.

RESEARCH AND INQUIRY SKILLS

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • RIV.01: demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for research;
  • RIV.02: effectively communicate the results of research;
  • RIV.03: build collaborative work skills through self-reflection.

Specific Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

Using Research and Inquiry Skills

  • RI1.01: analyse research information to identify bias, prejudice and misinformation;
  • RI1.02: effectively employ a variety of research methods noting sources (opinion survey, demographic study, in-depth interview, database search);
  • RI1.03: use primary and secondary sources appropriately in conducting research;
  • RI1.04: organize, interpret, and evaluate information gathered through research (select relevant and up to date information for their topic or product, develop logical and supportive conclusions).

Effective Communication

  • RI2.05: summarize key ideas from research and document sources accurately;
  • RI2.06: effectively communicate research results using a variety of modes (e.g., graphic organizers, recorded interview, storyboards, summary reports, independent and/or group oral presentations);
  • RI2.07: incorporate various forms of technology (e.g. audio recording, videos, PowerPoint, slide projector, photo camera) as part of presentations, as appropriate;
  • RI2.08: communicate ideas using a variety of strategies (oral and/or written presentations, group discussions, debate).

Collaborative Work Skills

  • RI3.09: work effectively in small collaborative groups;
  • RI3.10: use self-assessment to strengthen cooperative learning/working skills.

 

One comment

  1. ​Thank you.

    Peace, Joy and Hope,
    Steve De Quintal
    Teacher, St. Mary’s CSS, 66 Dufferin Park Ave. Toronto, Ontario M6H-1J6. 416-393-5528 ext. 84293
    “that they may have life and have it the full.”
    “Snowflakes are one of nature’s most fragile things, but just look at what they can do when they stick together.” – Vesta M Kelly
    ***You can always email but a call or a visit will get a quicker response***
    ________________________________

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